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 Post subject: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 5th, 2014, 9:35 am 
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I'm sure some of y'all have heard about this... maybe? Anyway, Brian Barczyk of SnakeBytesTV and BHB reptiles is creating an online channel that focuses on animals. If you know Brian, you know he's a reptile breeder. However, with new shows on AnimalBytesTV there will definitely be some field herping. If you're interested in more about the direction that this channel is going just click this sentence. Anyway, I'll be hosting one of the shows. The preview is below. My goal through this show is to encourage other people to get out into nature and have experiences with a variety of animals so that we can get more people to love and respect nature, which will hopefully increase the public's understanding so we don't have people swerving to hit box turtles and indiscriminate killing of snakes. I also want people to realize that every animal is important and special. I'm a herper at heart but I also appreciate all the other animals so when I run into a birder I can understand their passion for birds, even though I may not be as into birds as they are. We need to change the way our culture views nature and this is how I'm making my attempt.

I also realize that not everyone on this forum or in the reptile/wildlife community is going to agree how I do things, like handling snakes for example. Keep in mind though that herpers aren't necessarily my target audience. I have to make this appealing to a broader audience because you and I already think animals are awesome. I need to get close and personal with some of the animals to convince people that don't give a crap about nature or animals that the animal I'm presenting is the most incredible creature in the world.

Lastly, I want to ask this community to check it out and support it (by watching & sharing) if you agree with its message of conservation of flora and fauna. Brian Barczyk is an insanely passionate guy and I think he can really make a difference through this channel.

If y'all have any questions, concerns, or advice I would be glad to hear them. My show comes out this Friday (July 11th). Thanks for looking at this thread. Y'all have a good one :)

Primitive Tim Trailer


AnimalBytes TV Channel Trailer


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 5th, 2014, 11:04 am 
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I'm so stoked about this!!!!!


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 5th, 2014, 1:03 pm 
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I have a dream where innovative cinematography into crypic situ and fascinating vantage points takes the place of gripping a struggling reptile and telling the GP how it lives. I think the media has the power to change why people care. It is always said that grabbing and holding is the only way to get people to care, yet that is all the shows have ever showcased, dominantly, yet we are still wringing our hands at the indifference.

What about hummingbirds and mountain gorillas? If catching animals and handling them are the only way to teach people, I guess they're screwed.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 5th, 2014, 3:18 pm 
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Kelly Mc wrote:
I have a dream where innovative cinematography into crypic situ and fascinating vantage points takes the place of gripping a struggling reptile and telling the GP how it lives. I think the media has the power to change why people care. It is always said that grabbing and holding is the only way to get people to care, yet that is all the shows have ever showcased, dominantly, yet we are still wringing our hands at the indifference.

What about hummingbirds and mountain gorillas? If catching animals and handling them are the only way to teach people, I guess they're screwed.
I do understand where you're coming from and I agree to an extent. Keep in mind that trailers by nature take the most "exciting" shots that will grab the GP's attention and make them want to watch. Don't give up on me yet. Please take a look at the show and if you have innovative ideas about how to get these fascinating vantage points I'd love to hear them. When I deal with snakes I do try to be as hands off as possible but how do I present a snake that wants to sit in a stump hole for days at a time?

Thanks for your input Kelly Mc.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 5th, 2014, 3:43 pm 
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It may not have been clear in my post, that I acknowledge Your wholesome intent and i would like to wish you much success in your endeavor. I was just articulating, perhaps wanting in grace, that the wrangling formula for personalizing impact hasnt shown itself to be the great aid in conservation enlightenment that it is spoken of.

It has impacted the reptile industry . The number one GP criteria heard when a person desiring a reptile is We are looking for Something To Handle. Enlarging the persons scope of perception beyond that primary motivation, is wonderfully possible, but one won't sell as many reptiles, and it takes more time and energy.

As for the stump dweller, yes time Does move differently for snakes. Perhaps people don't know that. Perhaps they could learn.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 5th, 2014, 8:19 pm 

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I like handling snakes. If I were satisfied seeing something across a field with a pair of binoculars I'd probably be a bird watcher. Then again I also eat red meat and drive pickups, so if one's thing is having a salad whilst driving a prius and listening to NPR en route to their herping spot, I suspect I'd make poor company.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 5th, 2014, 10:12 pm 
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luv_the_smellof_musk wrote:
I like handling snakes. If I were satisfied seeing something across a field with a pair of binoculars I'd probably be a bird watcher. Then again I also eat red meat and drive pickups, so if one's thing is having a salad whilst driving a prius and listening to NPR en route to their herping spot, I suspect I'd make poor company.


No duh. Your username kinda peeps that out.

kinda over needing to handle much, even though Im better at doing it without freaking them out than almost anyone ive seen. Im positive there are many others who can say the same. But my gut tells me you arent one of them, nor does that matter to you.

Yeah i eat meat too, and dont listen to people chattering on the radio no matter what consonants they broadcast from - so what. You as usual dont have the foggiest idea how flat and far away from a target your snarkisms fall.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 6th, 2014, 4:07 am 
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luv_the_smellof_musk wrote:
I like handling snakes. If I were satisfied seeing something across a field with a pair of binoculars I'd probably be a bird watcher. Then again I also eat red meat and drive pickups, so if one's thing is having a salad whilst driving a prius and listening to NPR en route to their herping spot, I suspect I'd make poor company.

I'll never understand why some people work so hard to turn themselves into caricatures... :?

Gerry


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 6th, 2014, 9:15 am 
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gbin wrote:
luv_the_smellof_musk wrote:
I like handling snakes. If I were satisfied seeing something across a field with a pair of binoculars I'd probably be a bird watcher. Then again I also eat red meat and drive pickups, so if one's thing is having a salad whilst driving a prius and listening to NPR en route to their herping spot, I suspect I'd make poor company.

I'll never understand why some people work so hard to turn themselves into caricatures... :?


(I worry that I'm picking on you a bit strong, musk, but if you can give me any connection between those activities other than an overconcern to promote some sort of caricature of a hard image, I'd love to hear it.)


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 6th, 2014, 10:04 am 
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Joined: November 30th, 2012, 7:45 am
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:roll:


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 6th, 2014, 12:15 pm 
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Rich in Reptiles wrote:
:roll:
Yeah, not exactly the direction I was hoping this thread would go....


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 6th, 2014, 2:10 pm 
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I like the promos, and I love the idea of nature programming by animal lovers, for animal lovers. Especially considering most animal programming on TV is by jaded network executives, for mindless gawkers.

I think the essential truth about snakes (that most of us ignore or don't want to admit) is that they are actually kind of boring, when you get down to it. They don't vocalize, they don't have a wide variety of visually entertaining behaviors, and they spend a lot of time staring blankly and flicking their tongues. The electric jolt you get when you flip something exciting, and the thrill of capture, are difficult emotions to get across on TV. I think it's one of those things that you really have to be there for. TV shows usually add some additional element to make snakes more exciting. There's the "put a lot of them in one place" method (Fear Factor, Indiana Jones), the "put your life in danger" method (Steve Irwin), and the "build up suspense by not finding the snake until the very end" method (Mark O'Shea). I agree, Kelly, that in an ideal world, the intrinsic value of nature for nature's sake would be enough to draw viewers, but I think the reality is that any show dealing with animals, especially snakes, has to find a method of translating the personal experience of discovery into something watchable.

As for the "wussy liberal birdwatcher" archetype, it just kind of makes me laugh, considering birdwatchers are, by an enormous margin, the largest nature-oriented demographic (behind hunting and fishing). You could add all the herp, bug, mammal, and fish people together and it wouldn't even come close to the number of birders. It's a vast and diverse demographic. They would have a much easier time ridiculing and stereotyping herp people. I have some birder guests coming over to my house in about 90 minutes. One of them drives a Prius. He ONLY eats red meat, and probably hasn't touched a salad since he was a toddler. The other is a dyed-in-the-wool conservative, and owns several dozen firearms. He has a pickup. We're all birders, but we're meeting at my house to photograph moths. Welcome to the real world.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 7th, 2014, 11:49 am 
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luv_the_smellof_musk wrote:
listening to NPR en route to their herping spot


Sorry, I can't resist this side-derailment. Actually I guess it's kind of relevant, since it has to do with animal-related broadcasting.

I went to the NPR website, and searched for "snakes" and filtered by "heard on-air."

http://www.npr.org/templates/search/index.php?searchinput=snakes&tabId=hoa&dateId=0&programId=0

The first result is "Serpent Experts Try to Demystify Pentecostal Snake Handling." There's also a piece on rattlesnake tail atrophy in South Dakota, a piece on Bill Haast, stuff on Florida pythons and Guam treesnakes and flying snake research being used by the Pentagon - about 714 results in all.

I wonder how many snake-related shows you'd find on your average country station, or classic rock, or metal, or whatever it is "meat and pickup trucks" people are supposed to listen to? Or for that matter, ANY other widely heard radio station?


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 7th, 2014, 2:05 pm 
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Hey I'm going to check that out :thumb:

As for forced caricature, hmm, me thinks luv the smell of musk might have even more in common with Sara Palin than we think, despite the Tom of Finland username.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 7th, 2014, 7:20 pm 
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I'm not sure why you're trying so hard to be what most of the world despises in America, luv_the_smellof_musk? At any rate, I've owned a few pickup trucks, I probably eat red meat twice a week, and I listen to NPR religiously. If we didn't get along it would most likely be due to some weird prejudice you have? As mentioned NPR has done quite a few reptile related pieces. My friend was on years back for her field work. So the overall gravitas you're going for is lost on me. Fitting into a little box has never been my thing.

At any rate I think Brian is a cool guy, and a self made man. I'm willing to check this out, sounds like a worthy project.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 7th, 2014, 11:21 pm 
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Snakes are secretive, seem boring, so condensing exposure of the capture and handling experience has proven itself to be a way of capturing some excitement. I didnt mean to rain on Primitive Tim's canopy (Your's is a Great Moniker, BTW :) ) And you seem like an earnest, compassionate and knowledgeable Herp Spokesman.

I think truth is important, and it has an odd way of doing great things, and balancing the adventure aspect with the truth, however discreet and seemingly unexciting it may seem to be, may be a challenge who's time has come.

Once when i was working it was pretty slow and i turned and noticed a woman had quietly came up the stairs into the reptile room. She didnt seem happy, she was rigid, troubled. I put down my bucket and walked toward her, asking if she needed help. She said she only came in to look at snakes, because her fiance loves snakes but that she is terrified of them. She didnt want to be, but attempts of her significant other to 'introduce her' to his pet snakes did not work out and only resulted in her feeling worse. It was important to her though, and i was touched by her candor and willingness.

I told her I would do what i could to help and she became very nervous and asked me to please Dont try to get her to touch or hold one. I told her what i always tell people who are afraid, that i am not going to take a snake out, Im only going to talk to you about them, and let you see them behind glass.

I led her to the area where i keep some baby / juvenile colubrids and introduced her to Paper Towel Tube Girl. An Okeetee with a very shy disposition, who unlike her siblings, wont take to the upright paper bag method - but only eats in a paper towel tube, which she also favors over her cork hide, so i just leave one in for her all the time.

Paper Towel Tube Girl had her chin on the rim of the cardboard tube, as usual. I told the woman to look closer if she felt comfortable, and she did. I shared a little about the particular snakes history, and then went on to talk about snakes in general, their place on the food chain in nature, and how important security and a serene environment is to them.

The woman was totally surprised about these realities, she had never thought about snakes being A Prey Item Themselves, she only thought of them as A Predatory Creature. She had never thought about a snake seeking to protect itself from harm, and she found that relate-able

Never had she considered that snakes were secretive, not sneaky, and defensive, not aggressive.

Her features and shoulders relaxed, and she understood. She looked at the little okeetee peeking out of the paper towel tube and her feelings changed.

She said she was less afraid now than when she came in :D and it wasnt because she saw a snake getting captured or because she was coaxed into touching one.

It was just finding out the truth.


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 8th, 2014, 4:15 am 
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Depending on how telegenic that woman's phobia was, Kel, it sounds to me as if you just described an episode in the upcoming hit show about you, The Snake Phobic Whisperer... ;)

Seriously, well done! :thumb:

Gerry


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 8th, 2014, 6:34 am 
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That's funny you bring that up about snakes not being on the top of the food chain. That's something I address with nerodia. A lot of wading birds eat them up so I explain why nerodia tend to be a very bitey genus and I even have a shot of a bittern eating a green water snake. I think it's extremely important that folks realize that snakes are the ones that are scared. sometimes I make fun of friends that are scared of snakes by pointing out that they're top of the food chain and this little snake is making the uncomfortable. I think that's just a little silly. :D


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 8th, 2014, 6:36 am 
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Gerry, it was the little okeetee behaving naturally who became an ambassador for all snakes that day, I'm just a serpents servant but I like it :D


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 8th, 2014, 6:40 am 
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PrimitiveTim wrote:
That's funny you bring that up about snakes not being on the top of the food chain. That's something I address with nerodia. A lot of wading birds eat them up so I explain why nerodia tend to be a very bitey genus and I even have a shot of a bittern eating a green water snake. I think it's extremely important that folks realize that snakes are the ones that are scared. sometimes I make fun of friends that are scared of snakes by pointing out that they're top of the food chain and this little snake is making the uncomfortable. I think that's just a little silly. :D



Sounds very cool, I'm definitely going to watch the show, that's a plan :beer:


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: July 16th, 2014, 6:34 pm 
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Kelly Mc wrote:
Sounds very cool, I'm definitely going to watch the show, that's a plan :beer:
Thanks! I'm really excited about it :beer:


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 Post subject: Re: AnimalBytesTV
PostPosted: August 3rd, 2014, 5:12 pm 
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AnimalBytesTV is awesome, keep the great work!


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