Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

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TJA
Posts: 26
Joined: September 2nd, 2015, 11:52 am

Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

Post by TJA »

I haven't posted in awhile, but wanted to share a few of my photographs from a recent visit to Peru. On the first half of the trip I attended a macro-shooting workshop (Bugshot, a great group that does U.S. domestic as well as out-of-country workshops), then afterward a few of us went upriver, deeper into the Tambopata National Reserve. We literally had no rain until the very last day we were there, which was great in some ways, but of course probably kept a lot of frogs out of view. Still, we saw many amazing things, including several of the famous parrot clay licks, where huge flocks of parrots and macaws come to eat mineral-rich clay. (The clay is thought to help them acquire minerals missing from their diet, and/or help them rid their bodies of toxins found in many rainforest plants, seeds, and fruit.) In any event, it was the trip of a lifetime.

As for the photos, I've tried to ID the herps to the best of my ability, although a couple of toads in particular I wasn't sure about. Feel free to correct whatever I've gotten wrong, and any ID help is most welcome. Also, I have many more shots from the trip on my Flickr page.

Sideneck Turtle (I think Yellow-Spotted Amazon, Podocnemis unifilis) being photobombed by a bee.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/KFCUGJ by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Dart frog, Ranitomeya ventrimaculata
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Lh4rah by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Wandering Spider (Ctenidae) attacking a pleasing fungus beetle - the spider only held the beetle for a few seconds before releasing it. I don't know if the beetle was too tough, or if it perhaps had some kind of chemical defense.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Kbqoge by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Gonatodes sp. gecko
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/KFCSFu by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Katydid killed by a Cordyceps fungus
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/L14GtQ by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Lacewing eggs
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/L3Ay9i by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Blunt Headed Tree Snake, Imantodes cenchoa
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LecuoM by Tom Astle, on Flickr

I believe Phyllomedusa palliata
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LaZLbM by Tom Astle, on Flickr

The same individual as above
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LvHME4 by Tom Astle, on Flickr

A small spider I found which we dubbed the "Butt-Head Spider"
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/L7xytD by Tom Astle, on Flickr

The less-dangerous end of a Bullet Ant, Paraponera clavata
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LjBadK by Tom Astle, on Flickr

I think Allobates femoralis
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Losn7Q by Tom Astle, on Flickr

I think Ameerega trivittata
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LosnPb by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Conehead Katydid - this may be a predatory species
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/KvXQsX by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Amblypygid, ID given to me as Heterophrynus elaphus. These are awesome arachnids -- to many people scary-looking, but utterly harmless unless you're a moth or a cricket.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LtUFaG by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Day-flying moth, unknown sp.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Ld9m62 by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Hypsiboas fasciatus
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/KySrdx by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Another Hypsiboas fasciatus, probably smiling because of the bug leg sticking out of its mouth
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LCZ13A by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Hypsiboas fasciatus
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LDLdCf by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Leaf-Mimic Katydid pair. It was suggested to me that this behavior -- the smaller male perched on the female in this posture -- might be mate-guarding behavior, his way of keeping an eye out for other males.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Likoi7 by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Scarlet Macaws, Ara macao, doing a little sky dancing
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/KfT6c6 by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Unknown small toad sp. I saw three different individuals over several days, none larger than 4-5 cm. ID appreciated!
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LFx2vt by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Another unknown toad sp., not the same as the previous animal. This one was maybe about 6 cm.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LCWzJD by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Big ol' Bufo marinus, I presume
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LKTGuk by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Bark Mantis
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/KtY94k by Tom Astle, on Flickr

No-touch caterpillar, unknown sp.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Lw4k3C by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Flannel Moth Caterpillar, I believe Megalopygidae, very much a no-touch species due to its venomous hairs
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Ls6n2c by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Unknown Anolis sp.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LAkmz5 by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Plica plica portrait
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LCWb3R by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Stink bug sp.
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LzEzJy by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Mealy Amazon parrots and Blue-Headed Pionus parrots, gathered near a clay lick
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LqE7UF by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Female wandering spider guarding egg sac, possibly Phoneutria sp, warning a photographer to back the f off, a warning which said photographer heeded
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Lc9XHb by Tom Astle, on Flickr

Rhinella margaritifera sp. complex toad
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/LsFYfW by Tom Astle, on Flickr

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Jeroen Speybroeck
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Re: Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

Post by Jeroen Speybroeck »

Much enjoyed, thanks!!! Your first unnamed toad is Engystomops petersi (or a close relative). The second strikes me as another margaritifera complex member.

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Steve Barten
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Re: Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

Post by Steve Barten »

Outstanding photography. The macaw photo is really special.

DarwinsBulldog
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Re: Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

Post by DarwinsBulldog »

Dart frog, Ranitomeya ventrimaculata
Imagehttps://flic.kr/p/Lh4rah by Tom Astle, on Flickr

I believe this may be the biolat morph of R. sirensis, amazing shots though man. I made it to Peru years ago and I still think of my travels on a regular basis. Did you try for any frogs at night?

weigi
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Joined: March 19th, 2013, 2:04 am

Re: Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

Post by weigi »

Epic post, I really love the diversity. That bullet ant shot is wild. :thumb:

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TJA
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Re: Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

Post by TJA »

Thanks, and thanks for the ID advice, all! My only reference was an excellent, but 1994-vintage, edition of "Guide To The Frogs of the Iquitos Region, Amazonian Peru" by Lily O. Rodriguez and William E. Duellman. It was really useful to have along, although of course many of the species names have changed over the years. And to answer DarwinsBulldog, yes -- in fact, literally every frog/toad photo here was taken at night. Birds were shot in daytime of course, and a few of the arthropods, the Gonatodes gecko, and the anole sp. But probably 70% of my keepers were shot on night hikes, with diffused flash.

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Martti Niskanen
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Location: Helsinki, Finland

Re: Peruvian Amazon, July-August 2016

Post by Martti Niskanen »

Excellent post! beautiful photos, and the macaws one is a bit special.

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