Head torches/headlamps

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Kelly Mc
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Joined: October 18th, 2011, 12:03 pm

Re: Head torches/headlamps

Post by Kelly Mc »

Yeah it was really something, it makes me want to stick with them.

Enjoy your light and your herping nights :thumb:

danh
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Joined: October 19th, 2010, 11:56 am
Location: Canberra, Australia

Re: Head torches/headlamps

Post by danh »

Hi Everyone,

I'm currently in the market for a new headlamp so I appreciate all this input. I'm wondering, though, because no-one seems to have commented on how good these lamps are for reflecting eyeshine. Does anyone have thoughts on this? Which models/brands are better for detecting eyeshine off of herps at night?

Dan

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Field Herper
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Joined: July 7th, 2012, 5:15 am
Location: Oz

Eye-shine colour variation

Post by Field Herper »

Thanks Kelly :)

G'day Dan, that's an interesting notion and something that I hadn't considered in my selection criteria.
Whilst I can't answer your question I happened to ask a fellow on my last field trip about the different coloured eye shine of different animals, as I know that cats are green from personal experience. They reckon that different lights have a bigger influence on the colour of the eye shine but didn't elaborate.

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Josh Holbrook
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Re: Head torches/headlamps

Post by Josh Holbrook »

Dan,

In my experience, any LEDs will be equally good at reflecting eyeshine - animals' tapetum lucidum is supposed to be reflective, after all - Certainly any of Fenix's CREE LEDs will work great. I've also used one or two Lumintop lights lately, and they work well as well (although I've not yet tried their headlamp.)

-Josh

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Kelly Mc
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Re: Head torches/headlamps

Post by Kelly Mc »

Somewhere perhaps in a far and deep unknown night a Kung hunter composed a percussive poem like a Mozart among his people and it was a movement that lasted the full hungry stare of the moon and if he gave it a name in his tongue which I don't know if he would, it would have been Tapetum lucidum

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chrish
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Re: Head torches/headlamps

Post by chrish »

In regard to eyeshine, I 've always felt like too much light was a bad thing. If you shine a really bright light towards an animal looking for eyeshine, they seem to move away more often than if the light is lower powered. Didn't used to be an issue since lights weren't as bright as they are now.

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Kelly Mc
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Re: Head torches/headlamps

Post by Kelly Mc »

I agree. even on the smaller scale of using a ledlight in close tedium rehab work or to check out what my nocturnals are up to when I get up I have noticed that I muffle the light with my fingers.

Its discourteous to the living at best and at worse a jarring stressor. I do not know what actual damage could occur but even a short lapse of recoverable visual distress could be of negative consequence

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Field Herper
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Location: Oz

Re: Head torches/headlamps

Post by Field Herper »

Kelly Mc wrote:Somewhere perhaps in a far and deep unknown night a Kung hunter composed a percussive poem like a Mozart among his people and it was a movement that lasted the full hungry stare of the moon and if he gave it a name in his tongue which I don't know if he would, it would have been Tapetum lucidum
Well said Kelly. 8-)
chrish wrote:In regard to eyeshine, I 've always felt like too much light was a bad thing. If you shine a really bright light towards an animal looking for eyeshine, they seem to move away more often than if the light is lower powered. Didn't used to be an issue since lights weren't as bright as they are now.
Kelly Mc wrote:Its discourteous to the living at best and at worse a jarring stressor. I do not know what actual damage could occur but even a short lapse of recoverable visual distress could be of negative consequence
This is an important consideration and one that I dare say is often overlooked by many herpers and wildlife botherers in general. I've been guilty of this myself when I flood a subject with light in order to shoot video footage at night in particular. The blinding effect must be particularly intense for nocturnal animals.
I'm sure that most of us that have gone out spotting in groups would have been occasionally blinded by a fellow who looks at you with a headlamp on high. Newbies sometimes need to be reminded not to do this.
Some cyclists that have lights exceeding 1000 lumens can temporarily blind drivers, so potentially doing more harm than good.
So instead of all the emphasis being on maximum lumens it would be good if we all considered the welfare of our subjects and turned down the intensity of our lights, especially at close-range.

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