Photos from the Field (DUW)

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Matt Buckingham
Posts: 159
Joined: October 1st, 2012, 11:51 am
Location: Houston, TX
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Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Matt Buckingham » September 4th, 2013, 4:43 pm

The following is a collection of images from December 2012 until just yesterday. It's a long one, so be warned. I put the herps first for those who might not be interested in other taxa and landscape shots. The majority of the shots are from East Texas, but I've included a number from West Texas, as well as a few from Shenandoah and Zion National Parks.

SALAMANDERS

Ambystoma maculatum

These guys are sporadically located in high quality hardwood dominated forests in East Texas.

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Spotted Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spotted Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spotted Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spotted Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spotted Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spotted Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spotted Salamander Egg Mass by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Ambystoma mavortium

In early July I went to visit my pal Scott Wahlberg, who was doing some lizard surveys in West Texas. This beautiful salamander was found in a caliche pit following a major rain event.

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Barred Tiger Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Barred Tiger Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Barred Tiger Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Ambystoma opacum

Back in East Texas, it's always exciting running across one of these guys.

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Marbled Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Marbled Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Marbled Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Marbled Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

One November day while looking for new places to explore, I spotted what looked like a high quality bottomland hardwood forest from the road. It was loaded with large trees and woody debris. On closer inspection, I could see that it had been ravaged by feral hogs. I turned several logs to see if the hogs left anything, and was lucky enough to turn up a couple of marbled salamanders. I couldn't help but wonder how many of their cohorts were consumed by these nasty invaders.

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Marbled Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Ambystoma talpoideum

Despite putting in a fair bit of effort this winter, this was the only terrestrial adult I saw. I did see a number of neotonics and larvae.

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Mole Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mole Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Ambystoma texanum

The only Ambystomatid found in the immediate area of my neighborhood, it's always fun looking for these guys. The diversity in Texas animals is impressive, and we have some real lookers.

The individual below was found at a Conservation Easement Area about 10 minutes from my house. In June of 2012, when the property was still being considered for a Conservation Easement, I was surprised to turn up a few recent metamorphs while performing an inventory to document the baseline conditions. About a month later the Houston area experienced a massive rain event, and local waterways were flooded for days. Shortly after the flood event I returned to the site to measure some potential county champion trees. I could see that flash floods had swept through the wetlands, washing out the majority of the area's ground cover, and depositing large amount of new woody debris. I worried for the salamanders and other herpetofauna, as flood waters remained for several days. In fact I've read studies that state that such floods can be devastating to salamander populations. I was pleasantly surprised when I turned up this large adult under the first log I rolled in late February of this year. The Conservation Easement was signed in December of 2012.

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Smallmouth Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

The individual below was also found while monitoring a Conservation Easement Area, this one in the post oak savannah towards the western edge of what is commonly considered East Texas. It was found on a steep ravine.

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Smallmouth Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

The following two animals were located in the Columbia Bottomlands, a unique and imperiled forest community in Southeast Texas.

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Smallmouth Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Smallmouth Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Eurycea quadridigitata

An interesting looking individual from a high quality forested seep.

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Dwarf Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Desmognathus cf. conanti

A soon to be verified (or possibly described) Desmog from East Texas. Desmognathus in East Texas have disappeared from the vast majority of previously known localities.

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Dusky Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Dusky Salamander by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

FROGS

Anaxyrus debilis

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Green Toad by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Anaxyrus cognatus

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Great Plains Toad by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Anaxyrus fowleri

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Fowler's Toad by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Anaxyrus speciosus

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Texas Toad by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Scaphiopus hurterii

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Hurter's Spadefoot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Hurter's Spadefoot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Spea bombifrons

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Plains Spadefoot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Plains Spadefoot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Pseudacris streckeri

It was great finding these guys in abundance in a site in East Texas, as they have become quite rare in the region.

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Strecker's Chorus Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Strecker's Chorus Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Pseudacris clarkii

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Spotted Chorus Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Pseudacris fouquettei

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Cajun Chorus Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Hyla cinerea

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Green Tree Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Hyla squirella

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Squirrel Tree Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Lithobates palustris

I was lucky to find a couple of these last winter. They appear to be less common in East Texas than other portions of their range.

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Pickerel Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Pickerel Frog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Lithobates sphenocephalus

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Southern Leopard Frogs by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

LIZARDS

Coleonyx reticulatus

This was the highlight of my trip to West Texas with Scott. A species found in only two counties in the U.S., it seems to be fairly abundant where it is found.

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Reticulate Banded Gecko by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Plestiodon anthracinus

Another species that seems to be infrequently encountered in East Texas, coal skinks tend to be found in deep sand habitats such as longleaf pine savannahs and oak/farkleberry sandylands.

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Coal Skink by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Plestiodon fasciatus

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Five-lined Skink by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

SNAKES

Tantilla gracilis

Though it remains abundant elsewhere in the state, T. gracilis has become rare in Texas, as have most other species found in its preferred habitat - xeric sand ridges.

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Flat-headed Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Flat-headed Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Diadophis punctatus

This is the only herp I photographed while visiting Shenandoah with some good friends. Herping wasn't really the focus of the trip, though I managed to turn up a few other species.

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Northern Ringneck Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Heterodon platirhinos

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Eastern Hognose Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Eastern Hognose Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Storeria dekayi

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Marsh Brown Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Thamnophis marcianus

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Checkered Gartersnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Pantherophis bairdi

In my opinion one of the most beautiful snakes in the country. Photos can't do it justice.

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Baird's Ratsnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Baird's Ratsnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Bogertophis subocularis

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Trans-Pecos Ratsnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Trans-Pecos Ratsnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Lampropeltis alterna

This dark snake was tough to photograph, as all substrate in the immediate area was very bright.

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Gray-banded Kingsnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Masticophis flagellum

This was a bit unusual, I nearly stepped on this pair.

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Eastern Coachwhips by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Eastern Coachwhip by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Rhinocheilus lecontei

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Long-nosed Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Long-nosed Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Cemophora coccinea

Another snake that can be difficult to find in East Texas. Though they may be locally abundant, there appear to be few sites that support this species.

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Northern Scarlet Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Northern Scarlet Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Northern Scarlet Snake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Trimorphodon vilkinsonii

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Chihuahuan Lyresnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Chihuahuan Lyresnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Agkistrodon piscivorous

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Western Cottonmouth by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

This animal was found on a windy, 50 degree December day in the middle of a pipeline right-of-way while monitoring a Conservation Easement Area.

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Western Cottonmouth by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Crotalus horridus

Certainly one of our country's iconic herps, it's always a thrill coming across one of these in its element.

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Canebrake Rattlesnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Canebrake Rattlesnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Canebrake Rattlesnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Canebrake Rattlesnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Crotalus atrox

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Western Diamondback Rattlesnake by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr


OTHER ANIMALS

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Ocellated Tiger Beetle by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Periodical Cicada by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Periodical Cicada by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Painted Grasshopper by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Texas Leafcutter Ant by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Eight-spotted Forester Moth by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Polyphemus Moth by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Polyphemus Moth by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Striped Bark Scorpion by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Barred Owl by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Rose-breasted Grosbeak by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Bay-breasted Warbler by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Prothonotary Warbler by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Hooded Warbler by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Nine-banded Armadillos by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Nine-banded Armadillo by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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White-tailed Deer by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

PLANTS

Orchids are some of our most iconic native plants.

The Kentucky (or Southern) Lady's Slipper is rare throughout its range. In Texas it has been documented in only a few locations, and population estimates indicate that the number of individual stems might be in the hundreds.

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Kentucky Lady's Slipper by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Kentucky Lady's Slipper by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Kentucky Lady's Slipper by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

The following orchid was from my trip to Shenandoah.

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Lily-leaved Twayblade Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

An attractive Spiranthes from a high quality coastal prairie.

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Spring Ladies' Tresses by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

There is some debate about the validity of the following taxon. Some suggest that it is not distinct enough to be considered separate from Spiranthes praecox.

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Woodland Ladies' Tresses by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

One of Texas's rarest plants, known from only a few sites.

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Chapman's Fringed Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Snowy Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Grass Pink Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wetland Pine Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Rose Pogonias by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Rose Pogonia by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Green Adder's-Mouth Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Cranefly orchids are easiest to find in the winter and early spring, when their presence is betrayed by a single green leaf on the forest floor. In late summer, when they finally bloom, they can be difficult to spot, as their dull coloration blends with dried leaves.

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Crane-Fly Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Cranefly Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Crane-fly Orchid by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

The following group of flowers are typically known as spring ephemerals or early spring bloomers. They grow in early spring prior tree leaf-out while high levels of sunlight are still available on the forest floor. Many of these species are typical of eastern deciduous forests, and reach the western and southern extent of their range in East Texas, where they are often uncommon.

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Jack-in-the-pulpit by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Jack-in-the-pulpit by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Jack-in-the-Pulpit by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Jack-in-the-Pulpit by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Green Dragon by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Green Dragon by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Sabine River Wakerobin by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Sabine River Wakerobin by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Louisiana Wakerobin by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Bloodroot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Bloodroot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mayapple by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mayapple by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mayapples by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mayapple by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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White Trout Lily by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Arrowleaf Violet by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Common Blue Violet by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spring Beauty by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Lousewort by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wild Hyacinth by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Crossvine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Some carnivorous plants:

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Horned Bladderwort by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Small Butterwort by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Carnivorous Flora by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

The following are other species typical of pitcher plant bogs and other herbaceous seep areas.

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Barbara's Buttons by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Procession Flower by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Racemed Milkwort by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Maryland Milkwort by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Candyroot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Drumheads by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Milkwort by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Helmet Flower by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Golden Colicroot by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

More interesting flora

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Propeller Flower by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Propeller Flower by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Virginia Iris by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Swamp Leatherflower by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Cardinalflower by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Swamp Rose-Mallow by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Rare plants of longleaf pine uplands and oak/farkleberry sandylands:

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Scarlet Catchfly by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Scarlet Catchfly by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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White Firewheel by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Gulf Blazing Star by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Gulf Blazing Star by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

More upland species:

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Maryland Meadowbeauty by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Soft Greeneyes by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Carolina Larkspur by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wild Potato Vine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Some interesting plants of coastal prairies:

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Trailing Krameria by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Berlandier's Yellow Flax by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Powderpuff by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Meadow Pink by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Some milkweed:

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Butterfly Weed by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Butterfly Weed by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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White Milkweed by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Green Milkweed by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Hybrid Milkweed by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

One of my favorite wetland plants:

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Lizard's Tail by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Some more good stuff:

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Mountain Laurel by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Texas Azalea by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Purple Flowering Raspberry by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Littlehip Hawthorn by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Red Columbine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

A couple of plants from Zion National Park. I didn't get a chance to herp the area, but took a couple of nice hikes.

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Golden Columbine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Golden Columbine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Columbine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Shooting Star by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

More stuff from East Texas:

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Eastern Redbud by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Eastern Redbud by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Flowering Dogwood by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Flowering Dogwood by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Red Buckeye by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

The pyramid magnolia is rare throughout its range, and occurs in some interesting plant associations in East Texas:

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Pyramid Magnolia by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Liverworts by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

HABITATS

East Texas

East Texas is primarily forested, and contains a diversity of different habitat types. The following are some of my favorites. Many of these areas are old growth, small pockets that have never been logged, or only selectively so. Others are mature second growth in near old-growth states.

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Mesic Ravine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Beech-Magnolia Forest by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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American Beech by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Beech-Magnolia Forest by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Slope Forest by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Slope Forest by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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East Texas Ravine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mayapples by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

A very large mature black cherry. A rarity throughout the country, as this species has been heavily harvested, primarily for use in cabinetry.

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Mesic Slope by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Cavity Tree by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Springhead by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Swimming Hole by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Colorow in the Rain by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spring Fed Stream by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Virginia Sweetspire by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Spring-fed Stream by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Baygall by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Baygall by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Baygall by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wet Forested Seep by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Rock Outcrop by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Catahoula Boulders by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mesic Sandy Loam Upland by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mesic Ravine by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Longleaf Pine Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Longleaf Pine Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Longleaf Pine Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Longleaf Pine Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Catahoula Boulders by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Longleaf Pine Upland by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Texas Leafcutter Ant Colony by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wetland Pine Savanna by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wetland Pine Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wetland Pine Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Hillside Seepage Bog by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Wet Herbaceous Seep by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Xeric Sandhill by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Fire by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Old Growth Cypress Slough by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Cypress Swamp by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Cypress Swamp by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Forested Wetland by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Bottomland Ridge by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Riparian Forest by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Columbia Bottomlands by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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East Texas Stream by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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East Texas Stream by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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East Texas Stream by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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American Hornbeam by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Ephemeral Stream by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Forest Edge by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Forest Clearing by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Coastal Prairie

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Coastal Prairie by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Prairie Flora by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Coastal Prairie by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

West Texas

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High Elevation Savannah by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Shenandoah

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Cove Forest by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Sunset by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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High Elevation Pine - Oak Forest by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Yellow-Poplar by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Mountain Stream by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

Zion

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Zion Canyon by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Hanging Garden by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Maple Grove by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Virgin River by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

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Virgin River by Matt Buckingham, on Flickr

User avatar
Soopaman
Posts: 923
Joined: March 18th, 2012, 6:34 pm
Location: Houston, Texas

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Soopaman » September 4th, 2013, 5:09 pm

Matt, I think you've got my East Texas post beaten!

My favorites, of course, were the alterna and horridus. Great photographs, as always. You've got a style that is distinct enough that I can usually tell who took it without looking at the watermark!

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Nshepard
Posts: 377
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 11:08 am

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Nshepard » September 4th, 2013, 5:12 pm

Great stuff! I always enjoy perusing your photography - always sharp and well lit!

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Tonia Graves
Posts: 212
Joined: December 8th, 2011, 2:40 pm
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Tonia Graves » September 4th, 2013, 5:38 pm

Great diversity & photography! Those armadillos look like they are posing for you!

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Scott_Wahlberg
Posts: 100
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 1:01 pm
Location: Nacogdoches, TX

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Scott_Wahlberg » September 4th, 2013, 5:44 pm

So many nice photos in here. I really like how you were able to catch the young Pyramid Magnolias in their element. I see that I missed a lot of good trips by moving out west. Your flower photos are top notch. I'm jealous of your Coal Skink pics, I've seen a number of them now and still don't have any decent pics.

-Scott

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pete
Posts: 745
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 6:11 pm
Location: cape cod ma.

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by pete » September 4th, 2013, 6:21 pm

Looked through this twice now. Absolutely fantastic !!

Thank you for putting up such a diverse group of wonderful images!

Rman
Posts: 142
Joined: April 22nd, 2012, 2:32 pm
Location: Baton Rouge, LA

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Rman » September 4th, 2013, 6:44 pm

I like it all. I like horridus the most. Very nice!

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Knightkrawler5
Posts: 257
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 5:54 pm
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Knightkrawler5 » September 4th, 2013, 7:56 pm

wow...love everything..especially the habitat shots!

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John Martin
Posts: 515
Joined: June 9th, 2010, 9:57 pm
Location: North end of Lake Okeechobee, Florida

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by John Martin » September 4th, 2013, 10:12 pm

Simply jaw-dropping! :shock: Your photography skills are amazing!! Can you tell us what camera/lenses you use? Do you use flash for daylight macro shots, or natural light? I loved the fact that you covered vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, and landscape in one amazing post - thank you very much... :beer: Also loved the pic of the identical quadruplets ;)

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kricket
Posts: 106
Joined: July 7th, 2013, 1:19 pm
Location: Alexandria, VA

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by kricket » September 5th, 2013, 5:40 am

This is such a wonderful post! I've never been to Texas, but now I feel like I've gotten a virtual tour of part of it. The habitat shots are especially helpful to put everything in context and all the images are really beautiful. You could totally publish these as a naturalist's guide to the area.

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JAMAUGHN
Posts: 1132
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Location: Santa Cruz, CA
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by JAMAUGHN » September 5th, 2013, 7:17 am

Just extraordinary. I can't decide if this post makes me want to visit Texas, or makes me feel like I've already been there. Both, I guess. If I can document an area half this well by the time I'm eighty, I'll be a happy person.

JimM

will lattea
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Joined: August 30th, 2010, 10:39 am
Location: East Coast

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by will lattea » September 5th, 2013, 10:35 am

wow... this was a really impressive post. i almost didn't look because I follow you on flickr but man am I glad I did! photos like yours are what motivates me to get out and learn more. thanks for sharing.

:beer:

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chrish
Posts: 3298
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 10:14 pm
Location: San Antonio, TX
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by chrish » September 5th, 2013, 10:51 am

I think you mistitled this post. It should have been "Frickin' Ridiculously Awesome Photos from the Field"

That armadillo shot is a classic! You could certainly make some money with that shot.

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MattSullivan
Posts: 419
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 1:07 pm
Location: New Jersey

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by MattSullivan » September 5th, 2013, 12:47 pm

pretty sweet. that tiger sal is gorgeous, id love to find one like that

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Stohlgren
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Location: Athens, GA (Columbia, MO)

Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Stohlgren » September 5th, 2013, 2:51 pm

You're the man, Matt. I never tire of viewing your photos, everyone seemingly perfect. I agree with Kyle that you have a distinctive style.

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sep11ie
Posts: 112
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Location: Houston, TX
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by sep11ie » September 6th, 2013, 8:38 am

Great post. Thanks for sharing. Once again I always love to see the local folks out there succeeding.

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walk-about
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by walk-about » September 6th, 2013, 10:30 am

Matt - this is a amazing body of work, sir. So impressed. The herp pics are perfect. Those coachwhips and scarlet snake just blew some circuitry here. I don't think I have ever seen a Cemophora with a dorsal lateral flare like that specimen - more typical of milk snakes...and I love the post arrangement with Rhinocheilus in order. The Anuran shots were epic, as well as the standing Nine-banded armadillo pod shot. THat is the best shot I have ever seen of that species anywhere. Habitat shots perfect as well. Just too much to comment on this one. I will be back for seconds and thirds, etc.

Rock ON!

Dave

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justinm
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by justinm » September 6th, 2013, 11:16 am

This post was amazing, what a feast for the eyes. Your photos are incredible.

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Jeroen Speybroeck
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Jeroen Speybroeck » September 6th, 2013, 2:56 pm

I absolutely love this type of post that doesn't seem to end, especially when it shows so much more than just the herps, thank you very much.

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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Matt Buckingham » September 7th, 2013, 7:23 am

Thanks all, for taking the time to go through the post and for the comments.
Scott_Wahlberg wrote:So many nice photos in here. I really like how you were able to catch the young Pyramid Magnolias in their element. I see that I missed a lot of good trips by moving out west. Your flower photos are top notch. I'm jealous of your Coal Skink pics, I've seen a number of them now and still don't have any decent pics.

-Scott
This post wouldn't be what it is without my boy Scott!
John Martin wrote:Can you tell us what camera/lenses you use? Do you use flash for daylight macro shots, or natural light?
These were shot with a Canon 7D. Macro shots and most herp shots were taken with a Canon 100mm F/2.8. Landscape shots with the Canon 17-40L. RE: lighting, I use as much natural light as I can. If flash is necessary I'll try to use it only to augment the scene, however a good number of these shots were taken with flash as the primary light source. When I utilize flash it's typically with 2 diffused off-camera units.
kricket wrote:You could totally publish these as a naturalist's guide to the area.
Thanks! I actually do have a grand idea of a coffee table book about the ecology of East Texas forests.
chrish wrote:That armadillo shot is a classic! You could certainly make some money with that shot.
Ha! Most non-herp people that view my photos identify that one as their favorite. I crept up to within 10 feet of these guys and they were oblivious. I then intentionally coughed, and they all stood up simultaneously.
Soopaman wrote:You've got a style that is distinct enough that I can usually tell who took it without looking at the watermark!
Stohlgren wrote:I agree with Kyle that you have a distinctive style.
It's funny that you guys say that, I've had the same experience with a number of photographers, including both of you, and Nate as well.

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John Martin
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by John Martin » September 8th, 2013, 5:56 am

Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions Matt. I gotta say, you MUST find a way to make some $$ from your photography! Yes, it's that good...

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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Martti Niskanen » September 8th, 2013, 6:55 am

Gorgeous photos and great use of flash.

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walk-about
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by walk-about » September 9th, 2013, 8:00 am

Ok, so now after going back for 'seconds', 'fourths' and beyond, I just made an observation in both this great post and Kyle's Soopaman's great Texas post....one thing was missing. I just could not put my finger on it at first and then it finally dawned on me: Western Pygmy Rattlesnake. LOL. Do you guys not see them much in the field, or was it just not a good year for them in Texas? Even without - still a perfect post sir. But hey, someone had to find something to complain about beyond the perfection. Again, extraordinary post(s) guys.

Rock ON!

Dave

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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Matt Buckingham » September 9th, 2013, 9:08 am

walk-about wrote:Ok, so now after going back for 'seconds', 'fourths' and beyond, I just made an observation in both this great post and Kyle's Soopaman's great Texas post....one thing was missing. I just could not put my finger on it at first and then it finally dawned on me: Western Pygmy Rattlesnake. LOL. Do you guys not see them much in the field, or was it just not a good year for them in Texas? Even without - still a perfect post sir. But hey, someone had to find something to complain about beyond the perfection. Again, extraordinary post(s) guys.

Rock ON!

Dave
Pygmies are definitely around. They have probably declined and become fragmented as around here they tend to prefer high quality mesic sites, which are disappearing fast. It's also a species that's rarely encountered haphazardly in East Texas (though it has happened). If targeted correctly they're fairly easy to turn up. I haven't gone looking for them the past couple of years, though I should, since I need some good photos!

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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Soopaman » September 9th, 2013, 2:55 pm

walk-about wrote:Ok, so now after going back for 'seconds', 'fourths' and beyond, I just made an observation in both this great post and Kyle's Soopaman's great Texas post....one thing was missing. I just could not put my finger on it at first and then it finally dawned on me: Western Pygmy Rattlesnake. LOL. Do you guys not see them much in the field, or was it just not a good year for them in Texas? Even without - still a perfect post sir. But hey, someone had to find something to complain about beyond the perfection. Again, extraordinary post(s) guys.

Rock ON!

Dave
To expand on this some more, I know of a couple good places to turn them up here in the Lone Star state, but they're not particularly close to me. One about 2.5hrs away, and the other nearly 4hrs away. Since there aren't any other new or particularly interesting species for me to locate in those areas, I haven't really pursued them. I did end up driving through one of the areas in mid-July on my way to a concert and spent a few hours looking around, but wasn't particularly hopeful as it was blisteringly hot.

But like Matt said, you don't usually come up on them haphazardly, and most of the habitat I hunt isn't exceptionally great for them.

Kyle

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MHollanders
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by MHollanders » September 10th, 2013, 1:42 am

Damn, buy me a drink before tickling my fancy like this next time!

Seriously though, probably the best Texas post ever. One question; how did you pull off that sunset shot in east Texas? HDR?

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Will Wells
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Will Wells » September 11th, 2013, 6:01 am

Awesome post, thanks for sharing!!!

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Carl Brune
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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by Carl Brune » September 11th, 2013, 5:44 pm

Great post, enjoyed scrolling through it. Excellent photography.

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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by pjfishpa » September 12th, 2013, 5:00 am

This is the quality I strive for (but only occasionally achieve!). I would like to comment on a few favorites but there are too many! Incredible pics. I can certainly appreciate the time and effort that goes into your photos and the work of putting this post together. Thanks!

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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by cameron.rognan » September 12th, 2013, 7:01 am

I really enjoyed going through these. Excellent work. Thanks for spending the time sharing your talents with us, even if it makes most of us jealous.

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Re: Photos from the Field (DUW)

Post by BillMcGighan » September 13th, 2013, 6:01 pm

Sensory overload, Matt.
Looks like you covered lots of ground.
I like how you included much more than herps.
Great job. :thumb: :thumb:

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