Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

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ewostl
Posts: 52
Joined: August 28th, 2010, 2:15 pm

Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by ewostl »

The lizards in are in Australia were diverse, numerous, and often an pain to ID. Any help on that front would be great. The geckos were awesome, but I struck out on several Varanus sp that I hoped to see. Quick note. I am posting these using a different monitor than I am used too and a lot of the pic's are looking a little dark. If you could let me know how they are looking on that end it would be appreciated

Cheers

EW


OK. This first photo is not a lizard but it fits in here best. We found two of these girls while walking around some mangroves at night during low tide. Not sure what the were doing. my best guess is that they were sleeping and the tide went out leaving them exposed.

Chelonia mydas
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Diplodactylus conspicillatus
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Gehyra australis

Gehyra koira
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Gehyra nana
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Gehyra sp. pilbara ?
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Gehyra variegata
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Heteronotia binoei
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Heteronotia spelea
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Lucasium stenodactylum
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Nephrurus levis

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Oedura marmorata
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Oedura rhombifer
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Strophurus ciliaris abberans
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Strophurus ciliaris ciliaris
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Strophurus jeanae
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Strophurus spinigerus
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Strophurus strophurus
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Strophurus wellingtonae
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Lialis burtonis
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Carlia amax
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Carlia sp.
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Carlia sp.
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Carlia sp.
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Cryptoblepharis buchanannii
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Cryptoblepharus cygnatus
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Cryptoblepharus metalicus
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Cryptoblepharus ruber
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Cryptoblepharus ustulatus
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Eulamprus tigrinus
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Eremiascincus isolepis
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Eremiascincus fasciolatus
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Hemiergis quadrilineata
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Gnypetoscincus queeslandiae
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Morethia ruficauda

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Tiliqua multifasciata
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Tiliqua rugosa
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Amphibolurus gilberti
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Amphibolurus longirostris
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Ctenophorus caudicintus
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Ctenophorus maculatus
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Ctenophorus nuchalis
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Ctenophorus sp.
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another Ctenophorus
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Pogona minor
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Varanus mertensi
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Varanus panoptes
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Varanus pilbarensis
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Varanus scalaris
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Varanus tristis
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Reptiluvr
Posts: 258
Joined: April 23rd, 2011, 6:49 pm

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by Reptiluvr »

Awesome post! Great photography. I'm super jealous of all the gecko and monitor finds. I don't remember seeing Ctenophorus species before. They remind me of collared lizards in the western US.

danh
Posts: 36
Joined: October 19th, 2010, 11:56 am
Location: Canberra, Australia

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by danh »

Great pictures! That is a weird looking C. nuchalis. Can you say the general region where you found it? Was it living on a salt crust somewhere? The Ctenophorus sp. looks to be a young C. reticulatus and the 'another Ctenophorus' looks a Diporiphora sp. to me... Anyway, cool pics! Looks like you've seen a lot of Aus.

Dan

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Fieldnotes
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Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by Fieldnotes »

:thumb: :thumb:

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JakeScott
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Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by JakeScott »

Great! One the best posts I've seen of Australian lizards. Thanks a lot for sharing!

-Jake Scott

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StephenZozaya
Posts: 145
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 4:31 am
Location: Townsville, Queensland

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by StephenZozaya »

Looks like you had a decent haul. Was that Ctenophorus nuchalis from Broome? And I agree with Dan on the C. reticulatus.


I've given my 2 cents on some IDs below.
ewostl wrote: Gehyra sp. pilbara ?
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Gehyra punctata if it was in the Pilbara.
ewostl wrote:Carlia sp.
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Carlia rubrigularis.
ewostl wrote:Carlia sp.
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Looks like a breeding male Carlia munda, but it could be something else. Where did you see it?
ewostl wrote:another Ctenophorus
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This looks to be a Diporiphora, rather than Ctenophorus. Without knowing where it's from, my guess is D. bilineata, but Diporiphora are tough to ID.


Stephen

urodacus_au
Posts: 52
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 3:35 am

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by urodacus_au »

Nice assortment of critters. Any chance of some rough locations? Particularly for the species you are unsure of.

Agree with SMZ4 for the Gehyra, heads too flat for pilbara.

The 'E fasciolatus' is likely a new species, found in the Pilbara somewhere in a nice cool gorge or cave?

The hatchling/ juvenile maculatus looks to be a scutulatus, I made the mistake once myself :lol:

That nuchalis is one weird looking dragon, didn't happen to have a play around Lake Disappointment or Lake Eyre did you?

Cheers
Jordan

ewostl
Posts: 52
Joined: August 28th, 2010, 2:15 pm

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by ewostl »

Thanks for the comments and ID help. You Australians know your SH## !! not only can you give me an ID but you are doing a good job of guessing where it came from !

The pale Ctenophorus is from the beach dunes near Broome. The "Carlia munda" was at Berry Springs, and the Dipriprophora was near the turnoff to the Bungle-Bungles. The mostly uniform colored Carlia was near Townsville. If you want more specific locations feel free to PM me.

If you don't mind I have two more that I have yet to ID, both skinks from the Athertons
a couple of these guys were active on leaves about a meter up at night, in the rain.
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This second one was pretty common during the day in the damp dark areas of the woods! (bad pic)
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Cheers

EW

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StephenZozaya
Posts: 145
Joined: June 7th, 2010, 4:31 am
Location: Townsville, Queensland

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by StephenZozaya »

If it's from Berry Springs, the Calira 'munda' is more likely to be rufiliatus, but it's difficult to say without the animal in hand. As for the plain Townsville Carlia, I can't quite tell if it's C. storri or a plain looking schmeltzii. Once again, I would need to have the animal in hand.

That Diporiphoria could be a few things, unfortunately, so I can't help you much there.

Those skinks in the 2 photos are Saproscincus basiliscus. It's not too uncommon to spot them sleeping in low vegetation at night.


Stephen

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Mike Pingleton
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Location: One of the boys from Illinois
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Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by Mike Pingleton »

great photos! I'm always stoked to see Strophurus sp.

-Mike

ewostl
Posts: 52
Joined: August 28th, 2010, 2:15 pm

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by ewostl »

Thanks again guys!

Jordan, That little maculatus/scutulatus was out on the NW cape. Would that influence your ID at all ?

Cheers

EW

urodacus_au
Posts: 52
Joined: June 8th, 2010, 3:35 am

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by urodacus_au »

EW,

NW Cape is a serious hole in my herping experience, with any luck i'll get up there over Summer. There's no records of scutulatus from the Cape in Naturemap at least. I'd never swear it was one or the other from a pic (and it's a juvenile) but it still looks scutulatus to me. Did you get any pics that show a nuchal crest? I cant make anything out.

This is a bad pic of a juvenile scutulatus from out near Wialki.
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Hopefully someone whos given the Cape a good going over can pipe up and let us know if scuts are present in the area.
Cheers
Jordan

ewostl
Posts: 52
Joined: August 28th, 2010, 2:15 pm

Re: Around the World in 120 days Part 3: Australian Lizards

Post by ewostl »

Thanks again Jordan.

It does look a lot like the scutulatus in your photo. I called them maculatus because there were quite a few adult maculatus around and my guide didn't show many other options in the area. I would love to hear more from people who are familiar with the cape.

Cheers

EW

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